12 Toys You Wanted for Christmas if You Grew up in the 1990s (2)

This is the second part of our article about toys you wnated for Christmas if you grew up in the 1990s. If you missed the first part, click here to view it.
 

SEGA Mega Drive

SEGA Mega Drive 2 with Sonic 3
SEGA Mega Drive 2 with Sonic 3

The Mega Drive was SEGA’s successor to the popular Master System console and their first 16-bit machine. Although not as popular as the Super Nintendo in Japan, its country of origin, it achieved a higher number of sales than its rivals in the UK and USA.
Once again, there were many great games out on this console including the Sonic the Hedgehog series, Streets of Rage, Road Rash and Ecco the Dolphin to name just a few.
 

Furby


The Furby craze hit the UK at the end of the 1990s and in total there were sales of over 40million units worldwide during the initial production. Released in 1998, the Furby continued to be popular until the year 2000. This ‘must-have’ toy was similar to the Tamagotchi in the sense that it required kids to look after it, but the Furby was a miniature robot resembling something like a cross between an owl and a hamster, rather than a hand-held electronic virtual pet.
The Furby would start out communicating entirely in its own language a.k.a Furbish but was then programmed to start using English words as time went on – a process aimed at mimicking the process of learning English.
 

Trolls

Troll-dolls
Trolls made a huge come during the 1990s, appealing to a new generation of children throughout the UK. You may remember asking your parents for one, to be told “we had these when we were kids” in a way that suggested that they had set the trend, which they probably had.
 

 
These funny looking creatures originated in Scandinavia back in the 1950s. Towards the the end of the 1950s, a Danish company started manufacturing on a commercial scale, and by the mid-60s they were selling like crazy throughout the USA and Europe.
Interest in Trolls waned during the 1970s and 1980s but they made an impressive comeback in the 1990s with new styles, colours and accessories to appeal to a new generation.
 

Fun Fax

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Not really a toy but an addition to your Christmas list that was sure to be welcomed ahead of many other, seemingly stupid, requests.
The Fun Fax was designed as a child’s version of the Filofax. Containing a range of activities, puzzles, quizzes etc with room for additional books to be added in to the organiser, it was a popular item for many kids long after the novelty of more expensive toys ran out.
 

WWF Action Figures

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The WWF (World Wrestling Federation) was hugely popular in the 1990s and so were the action figures from the franchise.
Kids would enjoy re-enacting bouts between their favourite wrestlers using  plastic figurines which were produced in a variety of different sizes throughout the decade.
 

Tracy Island set (Thunderbirds)

Demand was so high for this set that Blue Peter gave instructions on how to make your own one, due to toy shops selling out of the original
Demand was so high for this set that Blue Peter gave instructions on how to make your own one, due to toy shops selling out of the original

Thunderbirds, the classic puppet TV show from the 1960s was re-released by the BBC in 1992 to entertain a new generation of kids. A collection of toys related to the show was also released and soon became very popular, so much so that toy shops sold out of individual Thunderbird figurines as well as the Tracy Island set.
This play-set sold out very quickly and there were even reports of parents fighting with each other in toy shops to get hold of the last one in store. Blue Peter game to the rescue, offering a set of instructions on how to make your own one, which was actually pretty good but probably little consolation for the kids who had their hearts set on owning the real thing.
Blue Peter’s fact sheet for making your very own Tracy Island also became highly sought after, with demand for the instructions far outstripping supply.
Click here to see a scanned copy of the actual instruction sheet produced by the BBC.
 
So there it is, our selection of toys from the 1990s that you will remember fondly.
Did we miss any out?
Let us know in the comment section below.

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